Crystal Cove State Park, ‘Bommer Ridge’ ‘Moro Ridge’ ‘Mach One’ ‘No Name Ridge’

Activity: Day Hike

Date: February 25, 2019

Just under 8 miles, over 1,350 feet elevation change, 3.5 hours

The Newport Coast is one of my favorite spots for day hiking. So Cal has had so much rain lately that our reservoirs are full, and the storms have put a serious dent in our ongoing drought situation. This has brought us a stunning green landscape to enjoy in this late winter season and provided a perfect day to get out and enjoy nature.

 

The Park had multiple interior trails closed due to safety issues caused by the recent storms. I had to revise my hike to ridges on the West and East with the only cut across open going across the interior.
I started the hike on No Name Ridge. It must be nice to have a home bordering a state park.
Here is where I had to revise my hike. I ended up running into such closures multiple times, but Mach One trail got me across the interior to Moro Ridge which forms the other border of the park.
This is an example of some of the ruts the storm had caused from the water run off. This is an open trail, so I you can imagine what portions of the closed trails look like. I like to mountain bike this area and I certainly would not want to come around a bend at a high rate of speed and find something like this.

Spring seems right around the corner when you are enjoying temperatures in the mid 60’s, hiking in a tee-shirt and shorts, and observing the first blooms.

The more I hike the more I say to myself, I really need to get out more often, after all everyone can use a little more adventure in their life.

Mount San Jacinto from Idyllwild

Back on Top

Mount San Jacinto Peak
November 2, 2018
16.6 Miles, 5,219’ Gain

Three weeks after summiting Mount San Jacinto I was back. When I was there the first time it was with my friend Dexter. This time I went solo, and it was twice as far and twice the elevation. John Muir said the view from the top of this peak, one of the most prominent in the lower 48, was the most “sublime on earth”. Well, when I was there last time there was a monster storm rolling in so the view was less than stellar. Then my college friend, Jean Howarth Lindberg (Delta Gamma, OSU), jokingly commented, you took the Palm Springs tram to 7500 feet? She had done the Oregon portion of Pacific Crest Trail, and was not impressed, (of course she was probably in her 20’s). So this trip I left from Idyllwild, and the weather and the views could not be better.

I have been plagued the last few months with a racketball knee injury, but straight line seems okay even with a heavy pack. But it was hard last time, and it was hard this time. Last time I might have been dehydrated, and I definitely was feeling the altitude. When I arrived at camp in the dark last time I felt a little sick, and skipped dinner. I was better hydrated summiting this time, and perhaps a little more acclimated. But there were times, as I was being passed by 20 somethings that I was not sure I would make it. Like before near the top I was taking frequent breaks and breathing pretty heavy nearing the summit. But the big thing wasn’t the physical part because hard or not I knew I could do that, but I was also fighting the sinking sun. I did not want to be hiking in the dark again. Since I was taking another route, from the other side of the mountain, I made a deal with myself. If the trail I was on intersected where I thought it would, close to the top, I would finish. If however, it intersected much lower and I still had a long ways to go then I would skip the top. Because I certainly did not want to arrive back at camp in the dark again.

You see, on the first day once again I was caught after dark on a pitch black trail. I backpacked 5 miles to where I was camping. I left Idyllwild mid afternoon, but it was steep, the going was slower than I expected, and I had more weight, as I had to carry more food and water since this was a 3 day trip. I had two issues, both had to do with my camelbacks. One leaked in the trunk all over my backpack, so when I put it on it was wet. So I replaced the needed water with water bottles. Then while hiking my second camelback was leaking, again making me wet, and I was losing precious water. (I ended up having to ration the last day.) Anyway, the going was steep and slow with the heavy backpack, and I found myself hunting and pecking in the dark trying to make sure I was still on the trail. The trails are not always easy even in the daylight. At night, especially with it being Fall with lots of pine needles covering the ground, it can be quite difficult at times with a little head lamp. The temperature was dropping and I had a slight chill from being wet, mostly from the leaking camelback, but possibly from perspiration as well. Finally I was not sure I was still on the trail, and decided I would just pitch my tent and stay put until day break. When I turned around there was a sign saying Strawberry Junction, which was the designated camping area for the wilderness, sweet! So I made camp, fired up the stove and had 3 Sisters Stew. The boiling water in the pouch warmed my hands and I held it against my chest which was warming me up. Once I got in my tent and sleeping bag I was nice and toasty.

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Day two was a 10 mile or so hike. It was a loop so I would have maximum views from all sides of the mountain. When I finally made it to the summit I did not enjoy it as much as I would have liked to. There were a lot of people up there since the weather was so nice. Almost all of them were from the tram and so their journey was much shorter than mine. I had to wait my turn for a picture with the summit sign. Also I was pressed for time as I was burning daylight and I did not want to be hiking in the dark again. So strangely enough I am enjoying the view from the top the same as you are through my pictures.

I made it back to camp 30 minutes before sunset after enjoying some great views I had not seen before, although speaking of places where the trail is hard to see… I was so enthralled with the view that I missed a switch back. I thought to myself, this is like the worst trail ever. It is steep, loose dirt and rocks, the stickers are overgrown, hold it… this can’t be the trail. Obviously someone had been where I was before, but this definitely wasn’t right, so I back tracked and sure enough I had missed one of the zig zags.

After a great sunset and some backpack cuisine delight, I curled up in my sleeping bag. While backpacking it seems like I just cat nap all night. Which I suppose is better than last trip with the pouring rain and thunderclaps all night where I did not sleep wink. The funny thing is I would be thinking, okay it should start getting light out so at least I can get going and be doing something. I would check the time and it would be like 11:30 PM.

Day three was five miles back to Idyllwild. Another nice day with great views enjoying God’s creation.

Bommer Canyon Trail Irvine, CA

 

Bommer Canyon Trail Irvine California
February 6, 2019
4.6 miles, 814’ climb

I stumbled across this delightful little hike upon discovering one of my standard day hiking areas, Crystal Cove State Park at Newport Coast, closed due to all the rain that we had been experiencing.  

It was a beautiful day, although a little cool in the low to mid 50’s with a little breeze on this winters day, the rain clouds had departed leaving clear views of the snow capped mountains in the background, and greenery we are not used to seeing in So Cal. I kept saying to myself, “Where am I, Ireland?”, this is crazy! The bright green just seemed too foreign.

 

Since I was already there, and it was such a nice day, I decided I must do something. So the opposite side of the top of the hill, heading in the direction of the mountains, I spied what appeared to me to be an equestrian trail with railings and pea gravel on the trail. So I set off on this trek which brought me under the 73 freeway in the direction of Irvine.

 

I really like being in the wilds of the wilderness the most with little signs of civilization, but this was a day hike and would lead up to the aforementioned type of backpacking. It is important to do some smaller day hikes to prepare for the load, distance, and altitude of a backpacking adventure. This day hike had the buildings of Irvine in the distance, and some very snazzy homes framing the bottom portion of this open space preserve which is Shady Canyon.

After a short distance I came to the trail head marker announcing Bommer Canyon Trail. “Cool”, I thought. I didn’t even know this was over here. I was thinking, “Wow, I know it is winter and mid-week, but I have this whole place to myself.” I was to find out at the opposite trail head this trail also was closed, “Oops, sorry…” I did see a couple hiking, and 2 trail runners during my day hike so I was not the only one uninformed.

I really enjoyed this little hike along Bommer Canyon Trail through this protected wild lands preserve, especially since it was so beautiful with the snow on the mountains, and the green grass on the rolling hills.

 

 

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Heisler Park, Laguna Beach, California

Heisler Park along the Pacific Ocean in Laguna Beach, California is one of my favorite urban hikes.  It is so beautiful there, so serene, so charming.  It is pretty much a botanical garden on the Pacific.  Every time I am there I see artists trying to capture the essence of this magical setting.

The following pictures are of my hike this winter’s day. Winter’s day… I almost feel bad saying that, as a typical day in So Cal in the winter is much different than say were my daughter is studying at the University of Wisconsin where they have a low of -22.  MINUS 22 can you believe that?!  Well, it was very pleasantly in the low 70’s on this day at the beach in Laguna.

I have also combined some pictures of another day at this special place that I took in mid fall.  You can tell where they start as the skies are a clear blue without so much of a whisper of a cloud.

I park in the neighborhood, a very well to do neighborhood I might add, just north of the park.  Then I walk through the park enjoying nature, the ocean, the cliffs, the rocks, and the gardens that make up Heisler Park.

From there I head down the slope to Main Beach in Laguna.  This beach is sort of like Mayberry on the Andy Griffith Show.  It is surreal, it is almost to perfect.  It is the quintessential California kick back beach.  Everything is just so cute and so quaint, from the small little lifeguard station, the wandering boardwalk, basketball court, viewing benches, kids play ground, lifeguard tower.  It is, in a word, perfect.

I continue past Main Beach south viewing quaint little hotels, cliff side dining, and beach houses that range from kick back to wow I love it!

I walk as far as I can go without having to do a little rock scrambling, which I might have to do the next time to continue adding to my adventure.  But this hike there and back, stopping for pictures, and checking out tide pools, so let’s call it strolling, is about 2 hours.

What a special way to spend a day.

Fossil Ridge

Location: Near Red Rock, outside of Las Vegas, Nevada

Time: Early Winter

Activity: Day Hike

Fossil Ridge day hike was a solo adventure that I did in Nevada the day after Christmas 2018. It was under 5 miles with a climb in elevation of under 1,000 feet. The hike was rated moderate. It was a gorgeous day, and a good way to try and work off some of the treats from the holiday. The location is near Red Rock, which to me is almost spiritual it is so beautiful, and a must do anytime I am near Vegas. Usually I am hiking on the opposite side of the road that runs through the area, and closer to the mountains and to Red Rock, but this perspective was very special as you have the full expanse of that view. The Fossil Ridge Loop day hike worked its way along the cliff of a canyon which was very interesting. The other thing I really liked about the hike was at times I felt like I was hiking through a cactus garden.

Here the trail is along a cliff with the canyon below. This picture doesn’t really show the steepness, because it doesn’t capture the depth perception. When I stood on the side of the cliff peering over the side the updraft below my hat off and back about 15 feet.

It was like hiking in a cactus garden.

In the distance you can see Red Rock.

 

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It was in this area that I spied a pretty good sized jack rabbit.

 

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A very enjoyable little hike.

‘America Afloat’ USS Midway

USS Midway, San Diego, California ‘America Afloat’. To me this represents the best of America. It represents our resolve, dedication, engineering, and fortitude. This is our history. The USS Midway was named after a battle that was the turning point of World War II in the Pacific. The Midway was longest serving carrier, being commissioned around the end of World War II, and operated during the Korean War, Vietnam and into the 90’s and the Gulf War.

 

 

 

USS Midway
USS Midway one of three carriers in San Diego Bay.

USS Midway top deck viewing fighter
Here I am on the deck of the USS Midway, checking out this sporty little number from yester-year.

Aboard USS Midway
My son Alec and I enjoying a great day aboard ship.

A-3
Alec is seated under this A-3. The same type of plane that my Dad few reconnaissance during Vietnam. It was the largest jet that regularly flew off carriers.

USS Midway topdeckChange of Command taking place on USS Midway

USS Midway portside looking forward to the bow.
This shot is taken from the portside looking forward to the bow.

USS Midway, viewing helicopter on the topdeck.

Inside helicopter aboard the USS Midway
Hello Mom, I am in a helicopter

Buckled up aboard helicopter on the USS Midway

Inside fighter jet topside on the USS Midway
Every boys dream…

USS Midway fighter pilot

View of the deck of the USS Midway and Coronado Bridge from the tower.
Looking across the deck of the USS Midway and Coronado Bridge from the tower. That is the Coronado Bridge in the background.

CO’s Chair aboard the USS Midway
In the CO’s chair…

The Bridge of the USS Midway
From the Bridge…

Capt’s chair aboard the USS Midway
Alec tries on the Capt’s chair for size

USS Midway Starboard Side
The starboard side of the USS Midway looking astern.

WWII Veteran aboard USS Midway PosterWWII Veteran aboard USS Midway Pictures

CDR Stan Abele WWII Vet aboard USS Midway
This WWII Veteran is 96 years old, and flying his Corsair shot down a Kamikaze. We shook his hand and thanked him for his service. I mentioned my father was also a Navy Aviator with 30 years in the service of our country. He said, ahh “the Whale”, the nickname for the A-3.

Fighter Jet in the hangar bay of the USS Midway
While on the ship, Alec talked me into climbing in a fighter simulator which not only went up and down, but all around. We did a couple of rolls. Afterwards, the guy said that normally no one is able to shoot down a enemy fighter. Alec shot down 2, (and an additional one during the training.)

Corsair in the hangar bay of the USS Midway
Corsair, same type of plane the WWII Vet flew that we spoke with while on the ship.

Cockpit of aircraft in the hangar of the USS Midway.

Seated in cockpit of aircraft aboard USS Midway
We were able to climb into quite a few of the planes and helicopters.

Below decks of the USS Midway
A carrier is like a floating city housing 4,500 men.

Operations aboard the USS Midway
No!!! Not that button!!!!

The stern of the USS Midway
The End

Arizona Hot Springs

Location: NW Arizona, SE of Las Vegas, just south of Hoover Dam.
Time: Late Fall/Early Winter.
Activity: Day hike.

Left Las Vegas, Nevada with a friend. Headed Southeast over the Pat Tillman Memorial Bridge into Mohave County, Arizona. Crossed Highway 93 long before the Chloride turnoff and parked in a paved parking lot. Gathered daypack, followed the trail under U.S. 93 and headed towards the Colorado River. The hike was, well, see for yourself!

~Roger

 


 

 


An Adventurer’s Pursuit of Balance

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